Events by date or event type.         Event Listing(PDF)

Thursday, April 18

6-10 p.m. Art Gallery – Revolution, Art + Design faculty and student exhibition (Schrott Center). Free.

This art gallery will be open during all performances of the Butler ArtsFest and will showcase faculty work and juried student work reflecting the theme of revolution, whether political, artistic, or personal.

7 p.m. Opening reception (Schrott Center).

8 p.m. Dance Kaleidoscope – The Best of DK! (Schrott Center). $25/$7.50

Best-loved moments from the repertoire of Dance Kaleidoscope, including selections from PIAF, Frank’s Way and Frank and Friends (both with music by Frank Sinatra), Frère Jacques, and a sneak preview of Les Noces (Stravinsky), a new work in process.  >> Purchase tickets

8 p.m. Butler Theatre – Lunar Revolution 2.0 directed by William Fisher (Lilly Hall Studio Theatre 168). $15/$7.50

Devised by Butler Theatre students through improvisations, sampled images, sound, music, and text. Borrowing some of the structure from Schoenberg’s 1912 revolutionary cycle Pierrot Lunaire, we’ve taken inspiration from 100-year-old events and revolutionaries of 1912, including Ionesco and Terkel.

Tickets can be reserved online or by calling (317) 940-9247.

Friday, April 19

5 p.m. Lecture – “Music of the Arab Spring” student presentation (Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall). Free.

Coordinated by Sarah Eyerly, Jordan College of the Arts.

6-10 p.m. Art Gallery – Revolution, Art + Design faculty and student exhibition (Schrott Center). Free

6 p.m. Lecture – “Recycling and Art: A Call to Action” (Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall). Free.

Lecture given by Lawrence Lad, College of Business.

7 p.m. Lecture – “Beethoven and the Revolutionary Mind” (Schrott Center). Free with ticket to 8 p.m. Chamber Music Concert. James Briscoe, Jordan College of the Arts. 

8 p.m. Butler Theatre – Lunar Revolution 2.0 directed by William Fisher (Lilly Hall Studio Theatre 168). $15/$7.50

Devised by Butler Theatre students through improvisations, sampled images, sound, music, and text. Borrowing some of the structure from Schoenberg’s 1912 revolutionary cycle Pierrot Lunaire, we’ve taken inspiration from 100-year-old events and revolutionaries of 1912, including Ionesco and Terkel.

Tickets can be reserved online or by calling (317) 940-9247.

8 p.m. Butler Ballet – Giselle (Clowes Memorial Hall). $28.50/$23 and $21.50/$17

The 1841 Giselle ou Les Wilis is the essence of the Romantic ballet. Giselle is the story of a simple peasant girl who is betrayed by love, driven to madness, dies of a broken heart, and becomes a ghostly spirit. The brilliant score will be performed by the Butler Ballet Orchestra under Richard Auldon Clark.

Admission: For ticket information, visit the Clowes Memorial Hall Box Office, www.cloweshall.org, or charge by phone at (800) 982-2787.

8 p.m. Revolutionary Chamber Music

Butler faculty including Larry Shapiro, Thomas Studebaker, and Jon Crabiel perform Beethoven’s Kreutzer Violin Sonata, song cycle An die Ferne Geliebte, and works by Crumb, Peck, and Zivkovic. $15/$7.50

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Saturday, April 20

10 a.m. Butler Community Arts School – Children’s Percussion Concert (Schrott Center). Free.

Featuring youth percussion students from Butler Community Arts School and its community classes, performing with Butler percussion majors in a high-energy, fun concert.

10 a.m.-1 p.m.; 6-10 p.m. Art Gallery – Revolution, Art + Design faculty and student exhibition (Schrott Center). Free.

11 a.m. Butler Percussion Ensemble – directed by Jon Crabiel (Schrott Center). Free.

12 p.m. Lecture – “Viva La Revolución! A Collaborative Multimedia Essay of Cuba’s Revolution Past and Present” (Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall). Free.

Lecture given by Susan Adams and Brooke Kandel Cisco, College of Education.

1 p.m. Spoken Word – “Outspoken: Poetry and Spoken Word Performances by Shortridge High School Students and their Butler Mentors” (Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall). Free.

Coordinated by Susan Sutherlin, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

2 p.m. Butler Theatre – Lunar Revolution 2.0 directed by William Fisher (Lilly Hall Studio Theatre 168). $15/$7.50

Devised by Butler Theatre students through improvisations, sampled images, sound, music, and text. Borrowing some of the structure from Schoenberg’s 1912 revolutionary cycle Pierrot Lunaire, we’ve taken inspiration from 100-year-old events and revolutionaries of 1912, including Ionesco and Terkel.

Tickets can be reserved online or by calling (317) 940-9247.

5-6 p.m. on WFYI-1.  Great Performances: “Herbie Hancock, Gustavo Dudamel and the LA Philharmonic Celebrate Gershwin.”

Great Performances re-teams with the LA Phil and its Music Director Gustavo Dudamel for a third opening night gala concert showcasing the bravura conducting style and interpretive gifts that have made Dudamel an international sensation. The concert’s all-Gershwin repertoire will include An American in Paris, Rhapsody in Blue, and a solo performance of Someone to Watch over Me, spotlighting the virtuoso jazz piano of special guest Herbie Hancock.

7 p.m. Cocktail Reception (Schrott Center). Cash bar.

8 p.m. Butler Ballet – Giselle (Clowes Memorial Hall). $28.50/$23 and $21.50/$17

The 1841 Giselle ou Les Wilis is the essence of the Romantic ballet. Giselle is the story of a simple peasant girl who is betrayed by love, driven to madness, dies of a broken heart, and becomes a ghostly spirit. The brilliant score will be performed by the Butler Ballet Orchestra under Richard Auldon Clark.

8 p.m. Butler Theatre – Lunar Revolution 2.0 directed by William Fisher (Lilly Hall Studio Theatre 168). $15/$7.50

Devised by Butler Theatre students through improvisations, sampled images, sound, music, and text. Borrowing some of the structure from Schoenberg’s 1912 revolutionary cycle Pierrot Lunaire, we’ve taken inspiration from 100-year-old events and revolutionaries of 1912, including Ionesco and Terkel.

8 p.m. Butler Jazz Ensembles with Bobby Sanabria (Schrott Center). $25/$9.50 and $19.50/$7.50

Bobby Sanabria—drummer, composer, recording artist, producer, filmmaker, conductor, educator, and multiple Grammy nominee—has performed with a veritable who’s who in the world of jazz and Latin music including Dizzy Gillespie, Tito Puente, Paquito D’Rivera, and Larry Harlow.

>> Purchase tickets

Sunday, April 21

12:30 p.m. Lecture – “Art and Revolution in France” (Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall). Free.

Lecture given by Elizabeth Mix, Jordan College of the Arts.

2 p.m. Butler Ballet – Giselle (Clowes Memorial Hall). $28.50/$23 and $21.50/$17

The 1841 Giselle ou Les Wilis is the essence of the Romantic ballet. Giselle is the story of a simple peasant girl who is betrayed by love, driven to madness, dies of a broken heart, and becomes a ghostly spirit. The brilliant score will be performed by the Butler Ballet Orchestra under Richard Auldon Clark.

Admission: For ticket information, visit the Clowes Memorial Hall Box Office, www.cloweshall.org, or charge by phone at (800) 982-2787.

2 p.m. Butler Theatre – Lunar Revolution 2.0 directed by William Fisher (Lilly Hall Studio Theatre 168). $15/$7.50

Devised by Butler Theatre students through improvisations, sampled images, sound, music, and text. Borrowing some of the structure from Schoenberg’s 1912 revolutionary cycle Pierrot Lunaire, we’ve taken inspiration from 100-year-old events and revolutionaries of 1912, including Ionesco and Terkel.

Tickets can be reserved online or by calling (317) 940-9247.

3-9 p.m. Art Gallery – Revolution, Art + Design faculty and student exhibition (Schrott Center). Free.

6 p.m. Pre-Concert Lecture – Introduction to the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra performance (Schrott Center). Maestro Kirk Trevor, Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra. Free with concert ticket.

7 p.m. Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra — Iconic American Composers (Schrott Center). $25/$7.50

Featuring pianist Stephen Beus in the original jazz version of Gershwin’s ever-popular Rhapsody in Blue, Copland’s Clarinet Concerto, Barber’s Adagio for Strings, and Overture to West Side Story.

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Monday, April 22

10-11 p.m. on WFYI-3.  “How the Beatles Rocked the Kremlin.”

This is the unknown story of how the Beatles inspired a revolution that helped to destroy the communist system. Leslie Woodhead first met the Beatles in 1962 when he worked on a film in the Liverpool Cavern Club before the world had heard of the Fab Four. Twenty-five years later, when Woodhead began to make films in the Soviet Union, he became aware of how the Beatles legend had soaked into the lives of a generation of Soviet kids—even though they were barred from playing “Back in the USSR.” Now he has been on a journey to meet the Soviet Beatles generation and to discover how the Fab Four changed their lives. Featuring a bizarre collection of Beatles tribute bands, the film tracks down the stories of how the Cold War was won with music as much as with nuclear missiles.

Tuesday, April 23

8-9:30 p.m. on WFYI-3.  American Masters: “Louisa May Alcott: The Woman behind Little Women.”

The author of Little Women is an almost universally recognized name. Her reputation as a morally upstanding New England spinster, reflecting the conventional propriety of late 19th-century Concord, is firmly established. However, raised among reformers, skeptics and Transcendentalists, the intellectual protégé of Emerson and Hawthorne and Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott was actually a free thinker, with democratic ideals and progressive values about women—a worldly careerist of sorts. Most surprising is that she led a literary double life, under the pseudonym A.M. Barnard not discovered until the 1940s. As Barnard, Alcott penned a scandalous, pulp novel with vivid characters running the gamut from murderers and revolutionaries to cross-dressers and opium addicts—a far cry from her familiar fatherly mentors, courageous mothers and appropriately impish children!

 

9:30-11:30 p.m. on WFYI-3.  “The Storm That Swept Mexico.”

The Mexican Revolution, the first major political and social revolution of the 20th century, not only changed the course of Mexican history, but also profoundly affected its relationships with the rest of the world. “The Storm That Swept Mexico” looks at the complex historical, social, political, economic, and cultural forces that shaped the Revolution influenced its course and determined its consequences and legacy.

 

Wednesday, April 24

10-11:30 p.m. on WFYI-1.  American Masters: Joffrey: Mavericks of American Dance.

Documenting how the Joffrey revolutionized American ballet—combining modern dance with classic technique, art with social statement, and rock music with traditional choreography—this film is an expression of Robert Joffrey and Gerald Arpino’s vision and artistry. From a company that began with six dancers touring the United States in a borrowed station wagon in 1956, they grew to international prominence, transforming the face of dance with originality and bold, edgy new perspectives that challenged conventions. They gained extensive media attention, appearing everywhere from the Kennedy White House to the Ed Sullivan Show. The film weaves a wealth of rare archival footage with excerpts from many seminal Joffrey dances, shows the full history of the company, their struggles against financial or artistic setbacks, and how they resurrected and reinvented themselves. Narrated by Mandy Patinkin.

 

Thursday, April 25

5-10 p.m. Art Gallery – Revolution, Art + Design faculty and student exhibition (Schrott Center). Free.

5 p.m. Reading – “At War with General Franco” (Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall). Free.

Reading given by Michael Dahlie, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

6 p.m. Butler Theatre: Journeys, from SEVEN, directed by William Fisher and Dan Sherer [Program A] (Schrott Center). $10/$5 (Combination tickets for Program A and Program B: $15/$7.50)

Seven award-winning playwrights interviewed seven extraordinary women leaders from Russia, Nigeria, Cambodia, Ireland, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Northern Ireland, and Guatemala, and created monologues that illuminate the women’s inspiring journeys. SEVEN has been widely translated and produced globally.

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7 p.m. Cocktail Reception (Schrott Center). Cash bar.

8 p.m. Butler Wind Ensemble – conducted by Robert Grechesky (Schrott Center). $15/$7.50

Including Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Karel Husa’s Music for Prague 1968. Steven Stolen joins the ensemble in the premiere performance of Struwwelpeter by Butler’s composer-in-residence, Michael Schelle. Also featuring the world premiere of Revolution Calling by Frank Felice; Sean Kissane, euphonium, a winner of the Kappa Kappa Psi Koncerto Kompetition, also performs.

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Friday, April 26

5-10 p.m. – Art Gallery – Revolution, Art + Design faculty and student exhibition (Schrott Center). Free.

6 p.m. Butler Theatre: Journeys, from SEVEN, directed by William Fisher and Dan Sherer [Program B] (Schrott Center). $10/$5 (Combination tickets for Program A and Program B: $15/$7.50)

Seven award-winning playwrights interviewed seven extraordinary women leaders from Russia, Nigeria, Cambodia, Ireland, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Northern Ireland, and Guatemala, and created monologues that illuminate the women’s inspiring journeys. SEVEN has been widely translated and produced globally.

>> Purchase tickets

7 p.m. Conversation with Playwright Susan Yankowitz (Lilly Hall Studio Theatre 168). Free.

8 p.m. American Pianists Association Fellows Rosenkrantz and Sheppard (Schrott Center). $25/$7.50

Classical Fellows of the American Pianists Association, Thomas Rosenkrantz and Michael Sheppard perform two monumental 20th century piano works: Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion by Béla Bartók and The People United Will Never Be Defeated! by Frederic Rzewski.

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Saturday, April 27

10 a.m. Butler Community Arts School – Children’s Dance Concert (Schrott Center). Free.

Featuring youth dance students from Butler Community Arts School and its community classes, performing ballet and high-energy dances that revolutionized our dance heritage.

10 a.m. – 1 p.m.; 5-10 p.m. Art Gallery – Revolution, Art + Design faculty and student exhibition (Schrott Center). Free.

11 a.m. Indianapolis Children’s Choir – directed by Henry Leck (Schrott Center). Free.

The Cantantes Angeli in a family-friendly concert.

12 (noon) Lecture-demonstration – “Intersection of Dance, Religion and Culture” (Lilly Hall Dance Studio 310). Free.

Lecture given by Moira Frazier, student, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

1 p.m. Lecture and Film – “Revolutionary Film: Using Literature and Musicology in Project Based Instruction” (Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall). Free.

Lecture given by Cassandra Pixey, Donna Rund, Clowes Memorial Hall; Nate Foley, Sarah Papin-Thomas, Triton Central High School.

2 p.m. Lecture – “The Poetics and Politics of Change: Poems and Stories about Personal and Public Transformations from the Butler MFA in Creative Writing” (Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall). Free.

Coordinated by Andrew Levy, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

5-6:30 p.m. on WFYI-1.  American Experience: “Soundtrack for a Revolution.”

Soundtrack for a Revolution tells the story of the American civil rights movement through its powerful music—the freedom songs protesters sang on picket lines, in mass meetings, in paddy wagons, and in jail cells as they fought for justice and equality. The music enabled African Americans to sing words they could not say and it was crucial in helping protesters as they faced down brutal aggression with dignity and non-violence. The infectious energy of the songs swept people up and empowered them to fight for their rights. The documentary is a blend of heart-wrenching interviews, dramatic images, and contemporary performances by top artists, including John Legend, Joss Stone, Wyclef Jean, and The Roots.

6 p.m. Lecture – “Revolutionary Stravinsky and Schoenberg” [Inaugural Wayne C. Wentzel Lecture] Presenter: J. Peter Burkholder (Schrott Center). Free.

6:45 p.m. Butler Jazz Combos and Cocktails (Schrott Center). Free, cash bar.

The Butler University jazz faculty and students pay tribute to three legends of Indianapolis jazz: Wes Montgomery, J.J. Johnson, and Freddie Hubbard.

7-7:30 p.m.  Pre-Performance Talk with Larry Attaway and Susan McGuire (Schrott Center).  Free with admission to 8 p.m. concert.

 

8 p.m. Butler Dance and Music – Pierrot Lunaire and The Rite of Spring $19.50/$7.50

Butler Ballet presents Paul Taylor’s Le Sacre du Printemps (The Rehearsal). Dance history comes alive as we celebrate the 100th anniversary of Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring with the presentation of Paul Taylor’s choreography set to the two-piano version of this iconic and revolutionary score. Pierrot Lunaire conducted by Maestro James Caraher of the Indianapolis Opera.

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Sunday, April 28

3-5 p.m. Art Gallery – Revolution, Art + Design faculty and student exhibition (Schrott Center). Free.

5 p.m. Butler Symphony and Chorale Conducted by Maestro Raymond Leppard (Schrott Center). $25/$9.50 and $19.50/$7.50

The Butler Symphony Orchestra will play Beethoven’s Egmont Overture, Dvorak’s Nocturne, J. Strauss’s Emperor’s Waltz, Britten’s Soirée Musicales, and Vaughan Williams’ Serenade to Music. This special performance of the Butler Symphony features Maestro Raymond Leppard, conductor laureate of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, in his first appearance at Butler University.

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