Vegan Stuffed Baked Potatoes

Stuffed Baked Potatoes Recipe

2 large Russet or Yukon Gold potatoes, about 8-ounce each

⅓ cup non-dairy milk, plain, unsweetened

4 Tbsp oil-free hummus

1 cup cooked vegetables, chopped (onions, broccoli, cauliflower, etc.)

½ tsp hot sauce

½ tsp pepper and salt (optional)

 Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Prepare potatoes for baking by washing well, and poking several times with a fork or knife for steam to escape during baking.

2 Bake for approximately one hour, or until fork tender. Remove from oven and allow to rest until cool enough to touch. Slice potatoes lengthwise.

3 Scoop insides of potatoes into a bowl, being careful not to tear the skins. Leave a small rim of potato intact for support.

4 Lay the hollowed out potato shells on a baking sheet.

5 Mash the potato flesh in a bowl along with the remaining ingredients, combining thoroughly. Spoon mixture back into the potato shells evenly until each half is rounded and almost overflowing. Pop them back into the oven, and bake until heated all the way through, approximately 15 minutes. Remove from oven, and serve immediately.

Juice, A Healthy Choice?

What’s In Your Glass?

Who doesn’t enjoy a tall, cool glass of juice? The color is vibrant, the taste sweet, and it’s good for you, too. Not so fast, say some dietitians. Although the best kinds of juice give you some nutrients, the worst are hardly better than liquid candy. You just need to know the difference.  For a comparison and suggestions go to:

https://www.webmd.com/diet/ss/slideshow-juice-wars

Fish and Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Fish is a good source of protein and, unlike fatty meat products, it’s not high in saturated fat. Fish is also a good source of omega-3 fatty acids.

Omega-3 fatty acids benefit the heart of healthy people, and those at high risk of — or who have — cardiovascular disease. Research has shown that omega-3 fatty acids decrease risk of arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeats), which can lead to sudden death.  Omega-3 fatty acids also decrease triglyceride levels, slow growth rate of atherosclerotic plaque, and lower blood pressure (slightly).

Go Fish (At Least Twice a Week)

The American Heart Association recommends eating fish (particularly fatty fish) at least two times (two servings) a week. Each serving is 3.5 ounce cooked, or about ¾ cup of flaked fish. Fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, herring, lake trout, sardines and albacore tuna are high in omega-3 fatty acids.

Increasing omega-3 fatty acid consumption through foods is preferable. However, those with coronary artery disease, may not get enough omega-3 by diet alone. These people may want to talk to their doctor about supplements. And for those with high triglycerides, even larger doses could help.

Patients taking more than 3 grams of omega-3 fatty acids from capsules should do so only under a physician’s care. High intakes could cause excessive bleeding in some people.

Eating fish, is there a catch?

Some types of fish may contain high levels of mercury, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), dioxins and other environmental contaminants. Levels of these substances are generally highest in older, larger, predatory fish and marine mammals.

The benefits and risks of eating fish vary depending on a person’s stage of life.

Children and pregnant women are advised by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to avoid eating those fish with the potential for the highest level of mercury contamination (e.g., shark, swordfish, king mackerel or tilefish); to eat up to 12 ounces (two average meals) per week of a variety of fish and shellfish that are lower in mercury (e.g., canned light tuna, salmon, pollock, catfish); and check local advisories about the safety of fish caught by family and friends in local lakes, rivers and coastal areas.

For middle-aged and older men and postmenopausal women, the benefits of fish consumption far outweigh the potential risks when the amount of fish are eaten is within the recommendations established by the FDA and Environmental Protection Agency.

Eating a variety of fish will help minimize any potentially adverse effects due to environmental pollutants.

Five of the most commonly eaten fish or shellfish that are low in mercury are shrimp, canned light tuna, salmon, pollock, and catfish. Avoid eating shark, swordfish, king Mackerel, or tilefish because they contain high levels of mercury.

Healthy Horizons Lunch and Learn: Indiana Poison Center

Image result for sack lunch

Openings Still Available!

Come bring your lunch and learn with us!

  • Wednesday, March 27, 2019
  • 12:00-1:00 PM
  • Atherton Union 326
  • Door Prize Given

Image result for Indiana poison center

We are fortunate to have presenter, Adam G. Overberg, PharmD, BCPS, Director of the Indiana Poison Center.  Dr. Overberg will address poison prevention, education, public health and acute management.  The Indiana Poison Center (IPC) is an independent, nonprofit agency providing coverage and services for the entire state of Indiana. It serves as both an emergency telephone service and an information resource center, with services available to the general public and healthcare professionals 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Most poisonings are unintentional, which means they can be prevented. Educating yourself and your family about poison safety is one step towards preventing a poisoning.

http://indianapoison.trendyminds.com/

RSVP to healthyhorizons@butler.edu

 

Hot Chocolate 5K/15K – 3/30/2019

Race and raise money for “Make A Wish” Foundation.

March 30, 2019

The Allstate Hot Chocolate 15k/5k, coined as America’s Sweetest Race, is brought to you by RAM Racing. Established in 2008, the inaugural Allstate Hot Chocolate 15k/5k ran through the streets of Chicago, Illinois. Since its inception, over 200,000 participants have run for chocolate, making it the fastest growing race series in the nation! Each Allstate Hot Chocolate 15k/5k race features both a 15k (9.3miles) and 5k (3.1miles) distance and all runners are encouraged to join the fun! Participants receive an award winning goodie bag, which they collect at the expo along with their race packet. The chocolate really begins to flow at the Post Race Party where runners enjoy music, Hot Chocolate merchandise, and a finisher’s mugs filled with hot chocolate, chocolate fondue and tasty dippable treats! Make-A-Wish® is the official race charity of the Allstate Hot Chocolate 15k/5k! Make-A-Wish® creates life-changing wishes for children with critical illnesses. We are on a quest to bring every eligible child’s wish to life, because a wish is an integral part of a child’s treatment journey. Research shows children who have wishes granted build the physical and emotional strength they need to fight a critical illness. Don’t miss out on your chocolate experience. Where will you run for chocolate?

https://www.hotchocolate15k.com/indianapolis

Mobile Mammography at Butler University – Schedule Now!

What you need to do to participate:

  • Please read here to determine if you are eligible to participate.   If you are eligible, please call the St. Vincent Breast Center at (317) 338-9595 to schedule your appointment.  When calling, please inform the operator that you are calling from Butler University to schedule an appointment on the mobile unit.
  • Registration deadline – Wednesday, May 22, 2019.